Tag Archives: furry friends

7 Ways to Transition New Pets into the Home

The holiday season is a time of year where shelters everywhere experience many “gift adoptions.” While the thought of surprising your loved ones with a long anticipated furry friend might be heartwarming, many of these gift adoptions don’t work out. Why? Because many gift adoptions are impulsive. They can also be forced – where potential adopters feel pressured to pick any cute animal just to put him or her under the tree.

Instead of bringing home a pet for Christmas, we suggest purchasing a gift certificate from Seattle Humane. This way, you’re still surprising your family with an adoption, while giving your family time to search for your perfect furry friend! You’ll also be able to include them during the exciting search process.

But sometimes that PURR-FECT pet comes along, and you just can’t let go of him or her. If your home has resident pets, follow our pet tips below for a seamless introduction:

 

1. Introduce dogs in a neutral environment.

Dogs should be introduced in a neutral environment. Seattle Humane requires all dogs meet prior to introduction. But before bringing home your new family member, be sure to let the dogs meet again in a park.

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Leash both the dogs and introduce them in a calm area. Have one person handle one dog each. Make sure to keep walking until your dog’s body language is calm and relaxed. Keep leashes loose as tense leash can make your pet anxious.

Once the dogs are showing curiosity about each other, allow them some sniffing time. Treat good behavior in both dogs promptly. If the dogs lash out at each other, pull them away and resume walking.

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Typically, dogs will become at ease with each other after a good walk. But sometimes when taking them home, resident dogs may exhibit territorial behavior. Do not punish dogs for being aggressive. Remember that the introduction process is highly variable with each dog. Be patient and remain positive.

 

2. Introduce cats to resident pets by scent.

Cats should be introduced to resident pets by scent. Confine resident pets in one room and allow the new kitty to sniff around the house. Once kitty is adjusted to the new smells, confine him/her in a room of his/her own. See the picture below for room inspirations! Then allow resident pets to sniff out the house.

Once a day, rotate the pets. Confine and allow resident pets to explore kitty’s room. While resident pets are sleuthing, allow kitty to smell out the rest of the house.

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This process should take anywhere from 1-3 weeks depending on the pets’ personalities.

Resist the urge to throw the pets in one room to “work it out.” This ironically almost never works out and instead reinforces unwanted behavior. Also, never confine a cat in a crate while allowing resident pets to sniff around the crate.

 

3. Create positive associations with their scent.

To encourage a good relationship between pets, make sure to give them plenty of treats for good behavior. Do not yell, scold, and spank if they lash out on each other. This will make them associate each other’s presence with fear and anger. Instead, pull them away from each other and give them their needed space. Try again later, and promptly reward any good behavior.

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For kitties, feed new cats in their allotted room. And feed resident pets outside the kitty’s door. Once they seem comfortable, you may put kitty’s bowl on one side of the door, and resident pets’ food on the other side.

 

4. Allow sneak peeks.

For kitties and resident pets, once they’re comfortable with each other, allow sneak peeks. You may carry kitty and allow them to see each other. Reward good behavior. Moderate hissing is normal. But if fearful behavior comes out, put kitty back in the room. Try again the next day, and reward good behavior.

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Another good method is using a baby gate and keeping kitty on one side, and resident pets on the other. This allows them to get full view and interactions, while still providing a safe barrier.

 

5. Exercise the dogs regularly.

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If the dogs are tired out from exercise and play, a seamless home transition is more likely. Cooped up dogs are more likely to lash out from frustration.

 

6. Do not leave pets unattended.

Even though your pets might look like they get along, do not leave them unattended for a few months. You never know how pets will interact once you leave.

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Instead, continue to confine your new pet in their own space, while leaving resident pets in their usual set up.

 

7. Be patient and get your family on board.

Introducing pets to each other is a long process that requires lots of individual and team effort. Do not be discouraged if your pets need some time to get used to each other.

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Just keep trying, be gentle, slow down, and be positive. Also be sure to talk to your family to get a game plan on board.

Sweetheart Sunday – Poppy

It’s Sweetheart Sunday. Please meet Poppy, a 3-year-old purebred American Bulldog! 

Poppy is just the sweetest, gentlest girl you’ll ever meet.

 

 

Poppy has incredible manners. Watch her take treats oh-so-gently from my hand.

 

 

She has irresistible eyes that will melt hearts. She’ll look up at you adoringly when you show her some love.

 

 

Poppy is a quiet girl. But, she’ll let you know when she’s ready to play.

Watch Poppy politely asking me to play with her!

 

 

Poppy absolutely ADORES playing tug of war. She’s a fair player too!

She’s very strong, but knows how to play the game with gentle give-and-take.

 

 

She’ll hog the rope toy if you let her!

I highly suggest you do, because she talks to it and it’s one of the cutest things I’ve ever seen!  

 

 

Poppy’s also a major pro at fetch. She’ll literally play fetch with anything! Watch her chase her puzzle toy around.

 

 

Once you’ve played with her, Poppy doesn’t hold back her gratitude!

She’ll express her adoration for you by leaning on your leg and giving LOTS of gentle kisses.

 

 

So don’t delay! Come by Seattle Humane and adopt this gentle honey today!

 

Learn more about Poppy here

Introducing Sweetheart Sunday!

Happy Sunday fellow animal lovers! Today, we are launching an excited weekly post called Sweetheart Sundays where we feature a pet who is still waiting for his or her furr-ific home!

Our first Sweetheart Sunday is true to her title. Introducing the biggest love bug in the world, Rosalie!

Her name isn’t the only thing that’s pretty about her. Rosalie is a babe.

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I mean, look at those EYES!

Rosalie also got a brain to match her beauty. This girl is smart. Watch her sit!

 

But Rosalie doesn’t let her beauty and brains get to her head! She’s loves everyone! We met for only a few seconds before she went to give me hugs and kisses.

Then she put a tennis ball in my hand, and her goofball side REALLY came out during fetch. Watch her excitedly run for the ball and forget it! 

 

The best part about Rosalie? She’s still available for adoption. You know you can’t resist that face! So stop by Seattle Humane today and meet her today! 

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Check out more footage of this beauty.

For more information about Rosalie’s ideal home, visit her profile!

 

Leading Teens One Paw at a Time

“If we are to reach [the] world… we shall have to begin with children.” — Mahatma Gandhi

At Seattle Humane, we recognize the importance of fostering and nurturing our community’s youth with lifelong skills. Leadership, advocacy, and compassion are just some of the skills we are looking to support in our youth. That’s why we are excited to unveil our new program geared to young teens 12-17 years old, Teens for Animals!

One of our youth groups after completing their program

Focusing on the unique and profound human-animal bond, Teens for Animals (TFA) strives to teach youth the importance of being an advocate and educator within their community of peers, family and friends.

While exploring the responsibilities of pet ownership and learning of the important role pets play in our community, teens will learn how to be a compassionate civic-minded leader and team player of their own respective communities.

For those who discover a deep passion in animal welfare, TFA will provide an excellent platform for exploring and conceptualizing career opportunities!

Image Source // Seattle Humane
Teens of all ages interacting with our resident pets

TFA will meet 12 p.m. – 2 p.m. on designated Saturdays starting November through May. Class sessions are a combination of animal interaction, classroom activities, and welfare advocacy. We cover everything from puppy mills to feline behavior. Learn more about our program and requirements here!

If Teens for Animals sounds like a perfect program for you, or a teen that you know, hurry and apply now!

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Here are some of our teen program graduates supporting us during a marathon!

The extended deadline for this one-of-a-kind program is November 17th. There is a low enrollment fee of $25 per applicant. This fee helps cover costs of running the program, and will include supplies for teens – a teen volunteer t-shirt, name tag and binder.

We are committed to making our programs accessible to all, if you are unable to cover the enrollment fee, please submit a scholarship request at the end of the application.

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In action: the human-animal bond as a vehicle for instilling compassion, leadership, and civic-mindedness

Top 5 Reasons Why Senior Pets are Awesome

Here at Seattle Humane, it’s no secret that our senior pets are hidden gems. Often overlooked by potential adopters, senior furry babies are given the short stick because of misconceptions. But have no fear! We are here to shatter those misconceptions, and spread the word on why senior pets are simply awesome.

 

1. What You See is What You Get

Image Source // Pibble Life
Image Source // Pibble Life

There’s no surprises with these guys! Senior pets have had time to settle into their personalities – their likes and dislikes are easily known. Also, senior pets who come into our care have a slew of behavioral tests done, so that you will know every detail of what they’re like and what pet parent would make them happiest. We make it a breeze to find your perfect fit!

 

2. House Training? What House Training?

Image Source // Midwest Animal Rescue & Services
Image Source // Midwest Animal Rescue & Services

Say goodbye to constant midnight potty breaks! Say goodbye to the dreaded non-clumping litter! Most senior dogs and cats come with oh-so-desired house training skills. A word of advice though – if your senior pet starts having accidents at home, don’t stress. It’s simply time for a veterinary visit to ensure there are no underlying issues.

 

3. They Have Indoor Manners You Can be Proud of

Image Source // Seattle Humane
Image Source // Seattle Humane

Almost all senior pets have history. This means that they’ve lived in a home with other humans before, and understand how to properly behave at home. Most senior dogs know to chew on a bone or rawhide, and to stay clear of your shoes and furniture legs. As for senior cats, they are wise enough to know that scratching posts are much better nail sharpeners than your furniture. Your home (and wallet) are safe when bringing home a senior!

 

4. No Chill Pills Needed Here!

Image Source // Seattle Humane
Image Source // Seattle Humane

Senior pets have no need for chill pills, unlike their younger comrades. By the time cats and dogs turn 6 years old, they will have calmed down significantly from their baby and teen days. This means that they need less exercise and stimulation. But don’t worry – most senior dogs still love a hike and a good game of fetch, while most senior cats still love to play with their cat wands.

 

5. They Make the Best Pets For Kids

Image Source // Today.com
Image Source // Today.com

Because senior pets have are mostly house trained, well-mannered, and calm, they make excellent companions for kids. Don’t fall for the grumpy old senior stereotype. These young-at-heart furry babies are less likely to jump and overwhelm your kids – most of them will curl up and snuggle with your human babies and you! So if you’re looking for a furry companion, don’t forget to give senior pets a second look.